Human remains: anthropodermic bibliopegy and the appeal of the extreme in challenging the continuing external management of Indigenous remains.

O'Sullivan, Sandy Human remains: anthropodermic bibliopegy and the appeal of the extreme in challenging the continuing external management of Indigenous remains. Ngoonjook. (Submitted)

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Abstract

The title of this discussion paper is deliberately sensational, inviting
the reader into an investigation of horrific tomes covered in human
skin. In May, 2006 an article which made front page headlines in the
United Kingdom, also did the rounds of the international press. It
highlighted the gruesome discovery, of an anatomy text covered in
the human skin of what was presumably an eighteenth-century victim
of bibliological, rather than biblical, proportions (BBC News Online
2006). More interesting than the form and content of the find, which
as any biblio-historian would know was common-place as a means of
literally contextualising the material and often little more than a curio in
intention, is the public reaction and moral lesson that the editorial and
dissemination promotes—to transform and manage human remains
into a simulacrum of animal skin is wrong.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Culture, Indigenous Knowledge, Museums, Indigenous Spaces, Deaccession
Field of Research: 08 Information and Computing Sciences > 0806 Information Systems > 080601 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Information and Knowledge Systems
21 History and Archaeology > 2102 Curatorial and Related Studies > 210204 Museum Studies
Subjects: A General Works > AM Museums (General). Collectors and collecting (General)
Date Deposited: 20 Aug 2009 12:22
Last Modified: 14 Feb 2011 15:32
URI: http://eprints.batchelor.edu.au/id/eprint/34

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